Seniors Online logo

These delicious muffins add flavour and fibre to your diet

Try making these fig and raspberry muffins, they don't only look delicious, but are packed full of fibre and omega-3 fatty acids.

06/04/22

It’s that time of the year when figs are ripening on the tree and abundant in the supermarket, so why not try these delicious muffins from the Baker IDI health hubExternal Link .

Serves 4

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 50g dried figs, chopped
  • 1 cup (150g) plain flour
  • ¾ cup (120g) wholemeal plain flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ⅓ cup (75g) raw caster sugar
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 125g mixed fresh or frozen berries*
  • ¾ cup (180ml) buttermilk
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (60ml) light olive oil or sunflower oil
  • 1½ teaspoons natural vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower seed kernels

*Do not thaw frozen berries before using them as this helps prevent them from 'bleeding' through the batter.

Method

1. Place the fig and ½ cup (125ml) water in a small saucepan, then bring to the boil over low heat. Remove from the heat and set aside for 10 minutes for the figs to plump slightly. Drain well and leave to cool.

2. Preheat the oven to 180° C (160° C fan-forced). Line 24 mini muffin tray holes (30ml capacity) with small paper cases.

3. Sift the flours and baking powder into a bowl, then return the husks to the bowl from the sieve and stir in the caster sugar and chia seeds. Gently stir in the berries and fig.

4. Whisk the buttermilk, eggs, oil and vanilla together in a separate bowl. Add to the flour mixture and fold together until just combined; don't over-mix as the batter does not need to be smooth.

5. Spoon the batter evenly into the paper cases and sprinkle evenly with the cinnamon and sunflower seeds. Bake for 13–15 minutes or until the muffins spring back when lightly pressed.

6. Leave to cool for 5 minutes in the pan, then transfer to a wire rack to cool. (Muffins are best eaten on the day they are baked, however, they freeze well. Wrap each muffin in plastic film and seal in a plastic bag or airtight container for up to 3 months. Thaw at room temperature.)

7. Enjoy!

Keeping fit and well - advice from Chris White, Foundation 49 Chair

Foundation 49: Men's Health is a preventative health program supported by Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute that aims to inform, educate and ultimately improve the health of all Australians.

The 60s is a decade of major change, and good health can provide an opportunity to enjoy retirement, travel and spend time with family and friends.

By their 70s many know there is a significant link between their health and their lifestyle, and keeping fit and well, both physically and mentally, is essential, Chris says.

It is possible to increase the number of years you live beyond 70, and equally possible to be more productive and energetic across the years. The great benefit of this is the increased opportunity to stay involved with family, friends, your community and your favourite activities.

Steps to better health in your 60s, 70s and beyond, Foundation 49 advises:

  • Get moving at least 30 minutes a day with a walk or a bike ride, a game of gold, gardening, a hit of tennis – they’re all investments in your long-term mobility and energy levels
  • Enjoy socialising as much as possible – laugh lots out loud
  • Make an annual visit to your GP – an essential goal each birthday
  • Keep active and keep your weight down.

Find out more

Read more on our top tips on getting fit.

Try another healthy and delicious recipe for seedy crackers.

For a range of public health seminars and information to live a healthier life, search on the Baker Institute websiteExternal Link .

For more health tips check out the Baker IDI healthy cholesterol diet and lifestyle planExternal Link .

Reviewed 27 December 2022