Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Regan Kohu and Nina Katene - Week 9

Bec Reid

Hello, my name is Bec and we’re here with the Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined and in the groove in 2020. We’re delighted to be joined by Regan Kohu and Nina Katene. Hello Regan! Hi Nina!

Regan Kohu

Kia Ora, Bec!

Nina Katene

Kia Ora, Bec!

Bec Reid

Where are you today?

Nina Katene

We are in the comfort of my home.

Bec Reid

In New Zealand, by chance?

Nina Katene

No, we are in Melbourne, Victoria.

Bec Reid

And Regan and Nina, can you share with us the reverence and the place of Elders throughout Polynesia?

Regan Kohu

Yeah. Well, with our Elders, I think they play the most important role in our culture. They very much, you know, they pass down all the songs and the teachings of old. Without them, we'd be lost.

Nina Katene

We each have a responsibility to each other, us to them and them also to us. You know, them to teach us, like Reg said, the ways of old and for us to uphold those for generations to come.

Bec Reid

Can you share with us a little bit about the fantastic cultural group, Nha Uri Whaioranga and where that - where you share your culture through that group?

Nina Katene

Built on the foundation of the youth. So, we - we were all - the tutorship, we were all quite young and we just wanted to make a stand as young leaders and help other young leaders come through and stand proud for our culture.

 

Regan Kohu

We learn from a young age, you know, many songs that were passed on through the generations. So, we're just trying to keep that alive.

Bec Reid

Regan, can you share with us a little bit about poi, as an instrument?

Regan Kohu

Yeah, so the poi was originally used in the heat of battle. The men - you know, they would make it on vine or leaves, which is a type of plant and they’d put rocks in there to basically train their wrist and make them more supple for battle. There was a time where only the women would use the poi for entertainment but now it's been widely accepted that the men are getting involved as well. And, more notably, the LGBTQI community are getting involved because it kind of comes natural, theatrics and being on stage for a lot of our communities.

Bec Reid

Speaking of things from the past, Regan and Nina, can you talk to us a little bit about songs of old and where they live across Polynesian cultures?

Regan Kohu

Prayers and...

Nina Katene

Laments …

Regan Kohu

Laments are very important. I think the singing came later. It was more contemporary around those times but now, it's - you know, it's a vital part of our culture.

Bec Reid

Regan and Nina, can you share with us how this beautiful medley speaks to land, sky and heart?

Nina Katene

The first song, Purea Nei, speaks about being free and unleashing your inhibitions out into the world, out to the elements – to the wind, the sky, the sun and just really freeing yourself so that you can...

Regan Kohu

Live your best life.

Nina Katene

Yes. Pretty much, yeah and the second song, Whiti Te Marama, which talks about the moon and how it shines bright, which is a light at night for us to be able to see throughout the darkness.

[Regan and Nina singing]

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Regan Kohu says it’s fitting that kapa haka is part of the 2020 Victorian Seniors Festival reimagined, with respect for Elders being an integral part of Māori culture and performance.

 

Visit Regan and Nina's website: www.facebook.com/nguriwhaioranga/

 

Read Regan and Nina's Performer Profile.

 

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An online Festival is completely new for us and we hope you enjoy the performances.

Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Regan Kohu and Nina Katene - Week 9

Bec Reid

Hello, my name is Bec and we’re here with the Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined and in the groove in 2020. We’re delighted to be joined by Regan Kohu and Nina Katene. Hello Regan! Hi Nina!

Regan Kohu

Kia Ora, Bec!

Nina Katene

Kia Ora, Bec!

Bec Reid

Where are you today?

Nina Katene

We are in the comfort of my home.

Bec Reid

In New Zealand, by chance?

Nina Katene

No, we are in Melbourne, Victoria.

Bec Reid

And Regan and Nina, can you share with us the reverence and the place of Elders throughout Polynesia?

Regan Kohu

Yeah. Well, with our Elders, I think they play the most important role in our culture. They very much, you know, they pass down all the songs and the teachings of old. Without them, we'd be lost.

Nina Katene

We each have a responsibility to each other, us to them and them also to us. You know, them to teach us, like Reg said, the ways of old and for us to uphold those for generations to come.

Bec Reid

Can you share with us a little bit about the fantastic cultural group, Nha Uri Whaioranga and where that - where you share your culture through that group?

Nina Katene

Built on the foundation of the youth. So, we - we were all - the tutorship, we were all quite young and we just wanted to make a stand as young leaders and help other young leaders come through and stand proud for our culture.

 

Regan Kohu

We learn from a young age, you know, many songs that were passed on through the generations. So, we're just trying to keep that alive.

Bec Reid

Regan, can you share with us a little bit about poi, as an instrument?

Regan Kohu

Yeah, so the poi was originally used in the heat of battle. The men - you know, they would make it on vine or leaves, which is a type of plant and they’d put rocks in there to basically train their wrist and make them more supple for battle. There was a time where only the women would use the poi for entertainment but now it's been widely accepted that the men are getting involved as well. And, more notably, the LGBTQI community are getting involved because it kind of comes natural, theatrics and being on stage for a lot of our communities.

Bec Reid

Speaking of things from the past, Regan and Nina, can you talk to us a little bit about songs of old and where they live across Polynesian cultures?

Regan Kohu

Prayers and...

Nina Katene

Laments …

Regan Kohu

Laments are very important. I think the singing came later. It was more contemporary around those times but now, it's - you know, it's a vital part of our culture.

Bec Reid

Regan and Nina, can you share with us how this beautiful medley speaks to land, sky and heart?

Nina Katene

The first song, Purea Nei, speaks about being free and unleashing your inhibitions out into the world, out to the elements – to the wind, the sky, the sun and just really freeing yourself so that you can...

Regan Kohu

Live your best life.

Nina Katene

Yes. Pretty much, yeah and the second song, Whiti Te Marama, which talks about the moon and how it shines bright, which is a light at night for us to be able to see throughout the darkness.

[Regan and Nina singing]