Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Wendy Stapleton

Tristan Meecham

Now’s the time to assess the state you’re in. Can’t afford to lose, got to strive to win. Just remember that nothing stays the same. It just depends on how you play the game and our next guest knows it’s all about you. It’s Wendy Stapleton. Wendy, welcome. How are you?

Wendy Stapleton

I’m good, how are you, Tristan?

Tristan Meecham

Really good and, of course, they were the lyrics to your hit – no? Play the game. That was quite popular back in the day.

Wendy Stapleton

Yes, we had a top 10 with that, which was fantastic news. Recorded it over in England.

Tristan Meecham

Who were some artists that you collaborated with and loved performing with?

Wendy Stapleton

At a young age, I was involved in studio work, session work, so I basically did backing vocals on so many big artists before I even got my record contract - John Farnham, Joe Camilleri, John English, Glen Shorrock, Brian Cadd. Look, it was just a wonderful time. I was Delta Goodren’s mother on Neighbours, which was also a load of fun because she was gorgeous. So, I’ve had a ball.

Tristan Meecham

And even an iconic interview with the one and only Molly Meldrum.

Wendy Stapleton

That show was recorded literally the morning after Michael Jackson had died and Molly was on his way to the airport to fly over to America and he had been booked to do my show but, because of Michael passing away, we thought that he would probably just say I’ll do another interview when I come back but he didn’t. Molly’s an amazing amazing person. He drove out, recorded the interview and then drove to the airport

Tristan Meecham

Many people will know you as playing one of the most iconic singers of all time, Dusty Springfield. Was is it about Dusty that nourishes you personally and professionally?

Wendy Stapleton

I was offered the role of playing Dusty Springfield and that theatre show went for about 4 to 5 years in Australia and England. To this day, you know, I still sort of do it as a cabaret concert and I’ve had many, many fabulous days, especially during Seniors month, going all around Australia, performing the Dusty Springfield show. I’m very fond of this and Burt Bacharach was absolutely beautiful. He only allowed two women, at the time, to record his songs. One was Dionne Warwick. The other person was Dusty. So, when he came over to Australia, of course, I just nearly fell over.

Tristan Meecham

This week, the theme is all about nourishment at In the groove and I know nowadays that you are the founder and conductor of the Australian Women’s Choir. What is it about singing together, coming together, that you think is so nourishing for people?

Wendy Stapleton

A choir is so fabulous for people to share a friendship and singing – it’s been proven, even medically, that singing and sharing that is very, very healthy for you.

Tristan Meecham

Absolutely. It’s a beautiful way to build community and some nourishing moments with the audience. Do you mind sharing?

Wendy Stapleton

A couple of girls actually work for aged care, entertaining the aged citizens and, one afternoon, we went to St Johns. They were having a lunch and we were going to do some songs and, of course, the women all came in looking very excited and the blokes came in. They looked like they’d been dragged by their hair, screaming and, you know, not wanting to be there at all and we sang some songs and all of the women joined in and, toward the end of the songs, the men started joining in as well. So, they were having such a lovely time and we thought, we won’t finish up. We’ll put some music on and the girls in the choir went over to the ladies and some of the gents and said, would you like to dance? And, of course, you know, some of the guys jumped up but it was mainly girls dancing with the ladies. Toward the end, all of the guys jumped up and they weren’t going to let anyone get in the way and they were saying ‘I’ll dance with her, thank you very much’.

Tristan Meecham

Wendy, would you mind introducing the song that you’ve chosen to sing?

Wendy Stapleton

I’ve chosen this next song because her brother, Tom – they were the Springfields before she went solo. They were a trio and a sort of folksy group and Tom wrote this for the Springfields, particularly to try and break into the American market because they were massive in Britain. They were massive in Europe and Australia but they really wanted to try and break America. Tom had written some songs for a little group from Australia. He wrote Hey There, Georgy Girl, I Know I’ll Never Find Another You. I think you know who I’m talking about – The Seekers. But, he wrote this for the Springfields and he was such an amazing songwriter, It went straight into the top 10 in America and it’s called Silver Threads and Golden Needles and I hope you enjoy it. With my daughter, Ellie.

[Wendy and Ellie singing]

I don't want your lonely mansion

With a tear in every room

All I want's the love you promised

Beneath the haloed moon

But you think I should be happy

With your money and your name

And hide myself in sorrow

While you play your cheating game

 

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

And I dare not drown my sorrow

In the warm glow of your wine

 

But you think I should be happy

With your money and your name

And hide myself in sorrow

While you play your cheating game

 

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

And I dare not drown my sorrow

In the warm glow of your wine

 

Well you can't buy my love with money

Cause I never was that kind

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine. Yee-hoo!

 

Wendy Stapleton

The power of music. Unbelievable at any age. Absolutely.

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Wendy Stapleton’s performing career history is diverse, including acting as well as being a singer/songwriter, solo artist and lead singer.

Visit Wendy Stapleton's website: www.wendystapleton.com.au

Read her Performer Profile.

 

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An online Festival is completely new for us and we hope you enjoy the performances.

Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Wendy Stapleton

Tristan Meecham

Now’s the time to assess the state you’re in. Can’t afford to lose, got to strive to win. Just remember that nothing stays the same. It just depends on how you play the game and our next guest knows it’s all about you. It’s Wendy Stapleton. Wendy, welcome. How are you?

Wendy Stapleton

I’m good, how are you, Tristan?

Tristan Meecham

Really good and, of course, they were the lyrics to your hit – no? Play the game. That was quite popular back in the day.

Wendy Stapleton

Yes, we had a top 10 with that, which was fantastic news. Recorded it over in England.

Tristan Meecham

Who were some artists that you collaborated with and loved performing with?

Wendy Stapleton

At a young age, I was involved in studio work, session work, so I basically did backing vocals on so many big artists before I even got my record contract - John Farnham, Joe Camilleri, John English, Glen Shorrock, Brian Cadd. Look, it was just a wonderful time. I was Delta Goodren’s mother on Neighbours, which was also a load of fun because she was gorgeous. So, I’ve had a ball.

Tristan Meecham

And even an iconic interview with the one and only Molly Meldrum.

Wendy Stapleton

That show was recorded literally the morning after Michael Jackson had died and Molly was on his way to the airport to fly over to America and he had been booked to do my show but, because of Michael passing away, we thought that he would probably just say I’ll do another interview when I come back but he didn’t. Molly’s an amazing amazing person. He drove out, recorded the interview and then drove to the airport

Tristan Meecham

Many people will know you as playing one of the most iconic singers of all time, Dusty Springfield. Was is it about Dusty that nourishes you personally and professionally?

Wendy Stapleton

I was offered the role of playing Dusty Springfield and that theatre show went for about 4 to 5 years in Australia and England. To this day, you know, I still sort of do it as a cabaret concert and I’ve had many, many fabulous days, especially during Seniors month, going all around Australia, performing the Dusty Springfield show. I’m very fond of this and Burt Bacharach was absolutely beautiful. He only allowed two women, at the time, to record his songs. One was Dionne Warwick. The other person was Dusty. So, when he came over to Australia, of course, I just nearly fell over.

Tristan Meecham

This week, the theme is all about nourishment at In the groove and I know nowadays that you are the founder and conductor of the Australian Women’s Choir. What is it about singing together, coming together, that you think is so nourishing for people?

Wendy Stapleton

A choir is so fabulous for people to share a friendship and singing – it’s been proven, even medically, that singing and sharing that is very, very healthy for you.

Tristan Meecham

Absolutely. It’s a beautiful way to build community and some nourishing moments with the audience. Do you mind sharing?

Wendy Stapleton

A couple of girls actually work for aged care, entertaining the aged citizens and, one afternoon, we went to St Johns. They were having a lunch and we were going to do some songs and, of course, the women all came in looking very excited and the blokes came in. They looked like they’d been dragged by their hair, screaming and, you know, not wanting to be there at all and we sang some songs and all of the women joined in and, toward the end of the songs, the men started joining in as well. So, they were having such a lovely time and we thought, we won’t finish up. We’ll put some music on and the girls in the choir went over to the ladies and some of the gents and said, would you like to dance? And, of course, you know, some of the guys jumped up but it was mainly girls dancing with the ladies. Toward the end, all of the guys jumped up and they weren’t going to let anyone get in the way and they were saying ‘I’ll dance with her, thank you very much’.

Tristan Meecham

Wendy, would you mind introducing the song that you’ve chosen to sing?

Wendy Stapleton

I’ve chosen this next song because her brother, Tom – they were the Springfields before she went solo. They were a trio and a sort of folksy group and Tom wrote this for the Springfields, particularly to try and break into the American market because they were massive in Britain. They were massive in Europe and Australia but they really wanted to try and break America. Tom had written some songs for a little group from Australia. He wrote Hey There, Georgy Girl, I Know I’ll Never Find Another You. I think you know who I’m talking about – The Seekers. But, he wrote this for the Springfields and he was such an amazing songwriter, It went straight into the top 10 in America and it’s called Silver Threads and Golden Needles and I hope you enjoy it. With my daughter, Ellie.

[Wendy and Ellie singing]

I don't want your lonely mansion

With a tear in every room

All I want's the love you promised

Beneath the haloed moon

But you think I should be happy

With your money and your name

And hide myself in sorrow

While you play your cheating game

 

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

And I dare not drown my sorrow

In the warm glow of your wine

 

But you think I should be happy

With your money and your name

And hide myself in sorrow

While you play your cheating game

 

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

And I dare not drown my sorrow

In the warm glow of your wine

 

Well you can't buy my love with money

Cause I never was that kind

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine

Silver threads and golden needles

Cannot mend this heart of mine. Yee-hoo!

 

Wendy Stapleton

The power of music. Unbelievable at any age. Absolutely.