Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde - Week 20

Tristan Meecham

This week on In the Groove, we trip the light fantastic and welcome a new member from Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde, a world music inclusive community orchestra that meets in Northcote. Claire Chatfield, welcome to In the Groove. How are you?

Claire Chatfield

I’m so excited to be here. You have no idea. We’ve been working on this for months.

Tristan Meecham

Your wonderful orchestra has been together since 2008. Can you explain how the group came about?

Claire Chatfield

Our founder, Pietro Fine, about over 10 years created this group. He is a Klezmer expert. He’s drawing on many musical traditions but that’s very much a Jewish style of music, and he set that group up with some of his musical friends. The tradition is that you create an orchestra - or he calls it Orkeztra in this case - and invite community musicians to come along and play, and that’s what I’d like to get across, is this is community. So, we have very highly skilled people that love the music and want to engage and play together as a group, and people learn that way and they move up and they get more skilled.

Tristan Meecham

You mentioned that the orchestra profiles different diverse musical styles and cultures, Klezmer being one of them, obviously Balkan and middle eastern music. What is distinctive about these musical stylings?

Claire Chatfield

The Balkan music for example comes from eastern Europe and it’s complex timing that’s unfamiliar to us. We’re used to four beats - one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. Well, Balkan, they don’t do small numbers. It’s big, fat, juicy eleven beats or ten or nine or seven which to us is very unfamiliar and it’s also complex music, and that’s why I love it.

Tristan Meecham

What are some of the benefits of working and performing in community musical collaborations like this?

Claire Chatfield

Well, we all need to learn. We’ve got to start somewhere. Music, it can’t be a theory. You can’t learn it out of a book. The only way to gain skills and understanding of music is to play with people, and I was very shy about playing with people. I was always afraid to make mistakes and it was only when I started in 2017 playing with the Lismore Group that my skills suddenly went from almost not playing to - it just went right up. That was just playing with a group, and then I came down to Melbourne and played guitar with the Melbourne group. Again, that starts to go up.

It’s about playing together. It’s music. It’s about expressing who you are, what you believe in and joy, real joy. There’s a lot of joy in that music and there’s a lot of pain and sadness as well but the joy lifts us up every week every time.

Tristan Meecham

Can you tell us about your own individual music practice?

Claire Chatfield

I’m a songwriter. I mean, that’s why I studied when I went to the Northern Rivers Conservatory ten years ago and I created an album which I’m still finishing. This is one of those tunes. Yeah, it’s about my mother’s family in Ireland and the musical tradition that they grew up with. So, I wrote this song about that beautiful tradition and I think it’s familiar to Jewish music as well and a lot of those folk music styles where you grow up with the spoons, banging them on the table, playing them on the table and just whatever instruments have, they pulled them out. Mostly, it’s based on my memories, my mother’s memories and my aunt’s memories, and it’s a poem, a love poem to my mother’s family. It’s something I wrote for Mum and it’s called Put the Pot on Agnes, and that’s my mother’s name.

[Song - Put the Pot on Agnes]

Warm welcome waits

St Bernard’s down the hill

Come in by the fire and eat your fill

Slather some butter on the warm toasted scone

Pull up a pew and give us a yarn

Bread on the rack is soda fresh baked

Cut you a slice of caraway seed cake

Then young dog in the corner stores

wanting more

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

You and I, please give us a tune

your colours all afternoon

fiddle and your

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green
Forty Shades of Green

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

 

Granny used to say, “Remember where you come from, look out for others and pray every day. Write home often, mind your P’s and your Q’s and don’t bother your dad during the six o’clock news.” After supper, she’d make a hot cup of cocoa and sit down and watch The Late, Late Show, then on her knees she’d give thanks for our daily bread, for the 10 fine children that she had and for Baby Philomena whose soul she lay to rest.

" />

One of singer, songwriter Claire Chatfield’s happy places is on stage with fellow members of the inclusive world music orchestra, Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde.

 

Visit the  Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde website: www.facebook.com/orkeztra.org/

 

Read their Performer Profile.

 

While we kindly encourage you to submit your comments, thoughts and experiences below or on our Facebook, we expect that users will not post content that falls into the following categories and reserve the right to remove comments that are:

•            off-topic and not appropriate for discussion in this forum

•            in violation of another’s privacy

•            vexatious, fraudulent, deceptive or misleading

•            abusive, defamatory, threatening, harassing, discriminatory or otherwise offensive

•            of a political nature or promote particular services, products, or political organisations

•            illegal or advocates illegal activity

•            in violation of another’s intellectual property or infringe upon copyrights or trademarks.

An online Festival is completely new for us and we hope you enjoy the performances.

Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde - Week 20

Tristan Meecham

This week on In the Groove, we trip the light fantastic and welcome a new member from Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde, a world music inclusive community orchestra that meets in Northcote. Claire Chatfield, welcome to In the Groove. How are you?

Claire Chatfield

I’m so excited to be here. You have no idea. We’ve been working on this for months.

Tristan Meecham

Your wonderful orchestra has been together since 2008. Can you explain how the group came about?

Claire Chatfield

Our founder, Pietro Fine, about over 10 years created this group. He is a Klezmer expert. He’s drawing on many musical traditions but that’s very much a Jewish style of music, and he set that group up with some of his musical friends. The tradition is that you create an orchestra - or he calls it Orkeztra in this case - and invite community musicians to come along and play, and that’s what I’d like to get across, is this is community. So, we have very highly skilled people that love the music and want to engage and play together as a group, and people learn that way and they move up and they get more skilled.

Tristan Meecham

You mentioned that the orchestra profiles different diverse musical styles and cultures, Klezmer being one of them, obviously Balkan and middle eastern music. What is distinctive about these musical stylings?

Claire Chatfield

The Balkan music for example comes from eastern Europe and it’s complex timing that’s unfamiliar to us. We’re used to four beats - one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. Well, Balkan, they don’t do small numbers. It’s big, fat, juicy eleven beats or ten or nine or seven which to us is very unfamiliar and it’s also complex music, and that’s why I love it.

Tristan Meecham

What are some of the benefits of working and performing in community musical collaborations like this?

Claire Chatfield

Well, we all need to learn. We’ve got to start somewhere. Music, it can’t be a theory. You can’t learn it out of a book. The only way to gain skills and understanding of music is to play with people, and I was very shy about playing with people. I was always afraid to make mistakes and it was only when I started in 2017 playing with the Lismore Group that my skills suddenly went from almost not playing to - it just went right up. That was just playing with a group, and then I came down to Melbourne and played guitar with the Melbourne group. Again, that starts to go up.

It’s about playing together. It’s music. It’s about expressing who you are, what you believe in and joy, real joy. There’s a lot of joy in that music and there’s a lot of pain and sadness as well but the joy lifts us up every week every time.

Tristan Meecham

Can you tell us about your own individual music practice?

Claire Chatfield

I’m a songwriter. I mean, that’s why I studied when I went to the Northern Rivers Conservatory ten years ago and I created an album which I’m still finishing. This is one of those tunes. Yeah, it’s about my mother’s family in Ireland and the musical tradition that they grew up with. So, I wrote this song about that beautiful tradition and I think it’s familiar to Jewish music as well and a lot of those folk music styles where you grow up with the spoons, banging them on the table, playing them on the table and just whatever instruments have, they pulled them out. Mostly, it’s based on my memories, my mother’s memories and my aunt’s memories, and it’s a poem, a love poem to my mother’s family. It’s something I wrote for Mum and it’s called Put the Pot on Agnes, and that’s my mother’s name.

[Song - Put the Pot on Agnes]

Warm welcome waits

St Bernard’s down the hill

Come in by the fire and eat your fill

Slather some butter on the warm toasted scone

Pull up a pew and give us a yarn

Bread on the rack is soda fresh baked

Cut you a slice of caraway seed cake

Then young dog in the corner stores

wanting more

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

You and I, please give us a tune

your colours all afternoon

fiddle and your

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green

Crowd around the piano

Crowd staring in the window

Danny Boy and Money Malloy

Forty Shades of Green
Forty Shades of Green

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

Blackberry jam, Mrs Kennedy

Put the pot on, Agnes,

We’ll have a cup of tea

 

Granny used to say, “Remember where you come from, look out for others and pray every day. Write home often, mind your P’s and your Q’s and don’t bother your dad during the six o’clock news.” After supper, she’d make a hot cup of cocoa and sit down and watch The Late, Late Show, then on her knees she’d give thanks for our daily bread, for the 10 fine children that she had and for Baby Philomena whose soul she lay to rest.