Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Anthony Dillon - Week 13

Tristan Meecham

Today, on In The Groove, we welcome back a Victorian Seniors Festival favourite. He's already appeared as one half of the Gram-O-Phonie Brothers and, today, he appears as himself. Anthony Dillon welcome to In The Groove.

Anthony Dillon

Hello, everyone.

Tristan Meecham

What are some of your favourite things?

Anthony Dillon

Oh, boy. Lots of favourite things. I think I like things that transport me a lot. '50s glamour, the vocal harmonies of some of the '50s and '60s groups like The Ink Spots and the Andrews Sisters, going back further.

Tristan Meecham

Now, Anthony, before music and performance, can you give us a snapshot of what your life looks like?

Anthony Dillon

I grew up on a farm. Youngest of 9 children, in a tiny town called Iona in Gippsland. Early on, I discovered Mum and Dad's record collection in the stereogram, full of those singers - the Sinatras, the Doris Days, the Dean Martins, The Seekers. I always, always loved it but then I went off to uni and ended up being a very frustrated engineer for over 10 years. After a period, I realised that music is what I wanted to do deep down. So, I started doing a bit less engineering and computer work and more music and started off by busking, in fact and busking has so much delight for me. It's a real honest connection with people on the street and, you know, if you can survive as a busker, I think you can survive anywhere as a performer. It's very good performance training.

Tristan Meecham

What is it about the era of Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin that you loved so very much?

Anthony Dillon

I think the glamour is there but, also, I think there's a bit of innocence from that era. Dean Martin comes to mind, with his beautiful voice and the songs that are very transportive and elegant. I very much like that playful / dagginess / silliness of that era. My character, Frank, is borne of many of those things - the costume, the elegance, the innocence, a bit of silliness and, of course, the beautiful songwriting of that previous period with people - the songwriters and the lyricist would spend ages composing and polishing and polishing before they handed the songs across to all those singers who didn't write their own material. They used the material from the critically competent songwriters.

Tristan Meecham

What is it about your time travelling crooner character, Frank Lee Darling, that you love performing for people?

Anthony Dillon

It gets the opportunity to share music and gentle, playful humour with people who I encounter when I'm doing that. Performance is a strange world, very terrifying and very terrific. The chance to really connect with people is very special, performing. Happily step out from behind the microphone and enjoy having a dance with someone. If he sees that they might be up for a dance.

Tristan Meecham

As well as performing Frank Lee Darling, you collaborate with many different musicians and artists.

Tristan Meecham

Well, I'm very lucky to perform with a young fellow called Malcolm Hansford and we have great fun doing the Gram-O-Phonie Brothers act together.

Tristan Meecham

Anthony, can you please introduce the song you've chosen to perform for us today on In the Groove?

Anthony Dillon

Delighted to be singing a song today from Dean Martin, who I think embodies everything from an era of glamour, music, voice, a bit of silliness, a twinkle in the eye, that's for sure and it's a song that I love, a song to sing to, a song to dance to, a song called Sway.

Tristan Meecham

Anthony, thank you so much for joining us on In the Groove. It has been a swinging sensation and a pleasure to chat.

Anthony Dillon

Thank you, Tristan.

[Anthony Dillon sings Sway]

When Marimba rhythms start to play
Dance with me, make me sway
Like a lazy ocean hugs the shore
Hold me close, sway me more

Like a flower bending in the breeze
Bend with me, sway with ease
When you dance you have a way with me
Stay with me, sway with me

Other dancers may be on the floor
But my eyes will see only you
Only you have the magic technique
When we sway, I go weak, W-E-A-K

I can hear the sound of violins
Long before it begins
Make me thrill as only you know how
Sway me smooth, sway me now

Other dancers may be on the floor
But my eyes, they will see only you
Only you have the magic technique
When we sway, I go weak

I can hear the sound of violins
Long before it begins
Make me thrill as only you know how
Come on, sway me now

Oh, my darling, sway me now

 

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Entertainer Anthony Dillon performs classic hits from the 50s to the present as his alter ego; Frank Lee Darling, the self-assured, time-travelling crooner.

Visit Anthony's website: www.frankleedarling.com.au/

Read his Performer Profile.

 

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An online Festival is completely new for us and we hope you enjoy the performances.

Victorian Seniors Festival Reimagined 2020

Anthony Dillon - Week 13

Tristan Meecham

Today, on In The Groove, we welcome back a Victorian Seniors Festival favourite. He's already appeared as one half of the Gram-O-Phonie Brothers and, today, he appears as himself. Anthony Dillon welcome to In The Groove.

Anthony Dillon

Hello, everyone.

Tristan Meecham

What are some of your favourite things?

Anthony Dillon

Oh, boy. Lots of favourite things. I think I like things that transport me a lot. '50s glamour, the vocal harmonies of some of the '50s and '60s groups like The Ink Spots and the Andrews Sisters, going back further.

Tristan Meecham

Now, Anthony, before music and performance, can you give us a snapshot of what your life looks like?

Anthony Dillon

I grew up on a farm. Youngest of 9 children, in a tiny town called Iona in Gippsland. Early on, I discovered Mum and Dad's record collection in the stereogram, full of those singers - the Sinatras, the Doris Days, the Dean Martins, The Seekers. I always, always loved it but then I went off to uni and ended up being a very frustrated engineer for over 10 years. After a period, I realised that music is what I wanted to do deep down. So, I started doing a bit less engineering and computer work and more music and started off by busking, in fact and busking has so much delight for me. It's a real honest connection with people on the street and, you know, if you can survive as a busker, I think you can survive anywhere as a performer. It's very good performance training.

Tristan Meecham

What is it about the era of Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin that you loved so very much?

Anthony Dillon

I think the glamour is there but, also, I think there's a bit of innocence from that era. Dean Martin comes to mind, with his beautiful voice and the songs that are very transportive and elegant. I very much like that playful / dagginess / silliness of that era. My character, Frank, is borne of many of those things - the costume, the elegance, the innocence, a bit of silliness and, of course, the beautiful songwriting of that previous period with people - the songwriters and the lyricist would spend ages composing and polishing and polishing before they handed the songs across to all those singers who didn't write their own material. They used the material from the critically competent songwriters.

Tristan Meecham

What is it about your time travelling crooner character, Frank Lee Darling, that you love performing for people?

Anthony Dillon

It gets the opportunity to share music and gentle, playful humour with people who I encounter when I'm doing that. Performance is a strange world, very terrifying and very terrific. The chance to really connect with people is very special, performing. Happily step out from behind the microphone and enjoy having a dance with someone. If he sees that they might be up for a dance.

Tristan Meecham

As well as performing Frank Lee Darling, you collaborate with many different musicians and artists.

Tristan Meecham

Well, I'm very lucky to perform with a young fellow called Malcolm Hansford and we have great fun doing the Gram-O-Phonie Brothers act together.

Tristan Meecham

Anthony, can you please introduce the song you've chosen to perform for us today on In the Groove?

Anthony Dillon

Delighted to be singing a song today from Dean Martin, who I think embodies everything from an era of glamour, music, voice, a bit of silliness, a twinkle in the eye, that's for sure and it's a song that I love, a song to sing to, a song to dance to, a song called Sway.

Tristan Meecham

Anthony, thank you so much for joining us on In the Groove. It has been a swinging sensation and a pleasure to chat.

Anthony Dillon

Thank you, Tristan.

[Anthony Dillon sings Sway]

When Marimba rhythms start to play
Dance with me, make me sway
Like a lazy ocean hugs the shore
Hold me close, sway me more

Like a flower bending in the breeze
Bend with me, sway with ease
When you dance you have a way with me
Stay with me, sway with me

Other dancers may be on the floor
But my eyes will see only you
Only you have the magic technique
When we sway, I go weak, W-E-A-K

I can hear the sound of violins
Long before it begins
Make me thrill as only you know how
Sway me smooth, sway me now

Other dancers may be on the floor
But my eyes, they will see only you
Only you have the magic technique
When we sway, I go weak

I can hear the sound of violins
Long before it begins
Make me thrill as only you know how
Come on, sway me now

Oh, my darling, sway me now